Monday, March 27, 2017

Barley Lemonade

Generally found in the foods for the sick section, barley water was often flavored with lemons and sugar, but this recipe was actually named lemonade by famed chef Alexis Soyer.  The pearl barley is boiled in water, strained and added to the sugar water and lemon. Then the lemonade is strained.

The photo shows pearl barley uncooked on the right and cooked on the left.

Barley Lemonade.
Put a quarter of a pound of sugar into a small stewpan, with half a pint of water, which boil about ten minutes, or until forming a thickish syrup; then add the rind of a fresh lemon and the pulp of two; let it boil two minutes longer, when add two quarts of barley-water, from which you have omitted the sugar and lemon; boil five minutes longer, pass it through a hair sieve into a jug, which cover with paper, making a hole in the centre to let the heat through; when cold, it is ready for use; if put cold into a bottle and well corked down, it would keep good several days.  

Other barley drinks in the "Comforts for Invalids" section -

BARLEY WATER.—Put half a gallon of water into a very clean saucepan, with two ounces of clean (but unwashed) pearl-barley; when boiling, carefully skim it with a tablespoon, and add half the rind of a small lemon, let it boil until the barley is quite tender: sweeten with half an ounce of white sugar, strain it through a fine hair sieve, and use when required. The juice of half a lemon in some cases may also be introduced.

BARLEY ORANGEADE is made the same way as above (Barley Lemonade), substituting the rind and juice of oranges; the juice of a lemon, in addition, is an improvement, when taken as a refreshing beverage.

A VERY STRENGTHENING DRINK.—Put a teacupful of pearl-barley into a saucepan, with three pints of cold water, the rind of a lemon, and a small piece of cinnamon; boil the whole very gently until the barley becomes tender, then strain it through a fine sieve, and sweeten with a spoonful of treacle: if treacle should be objectionable, honey or sugar will do.

Soyer, Alexis.  The Modern Housewife.  London: 1851
 

©2017 Patricia Bixler Reber
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